Helpful OCD Links

Helpful OCD Links

We are collaborating with the OCD Treatment Centre in England, and highly recommend their resources, including this OCD self-test.   There is so much information about OCD on the internet. Below we are sharing links to the ones we find the most hopeful and helpful. Enjoy.

Recommended OCD Resources

OCD Foundation ocfoundation.org What is OCD? ocfoundation.org Materials & Fact Sheets: ocfoundation.org/materials.aspx Intensive Treatment Programs: ocfoundation.org/ITP.aspx Anxiety Disorder Association of America adaa.org Anxiety Social Net: anxietysocialnet.com Stanford School of Medicine: Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders ocd.stanford.edu OCD Center of Los Angeles (live and telephone cognitive behavioral therapy) ocdla.com/cognitivebehavioraltherapy.html ocdla.com/telephone-online-therapy-ocd-anxiety.html OCD Education Station ocdeducationstation.org Obsessive Compulsive Anonymous obsessivecompulsiveanonymous.org Tourettes Syndrome Association tsa-usa.org Trichotillomania Learning Center trich.org National Alliance for the Mentally Ill nami.org Mindful Awareness Research Center at UCLA marc.ucla.edu MedicineNet.com offers useful information on OCD as well as anxiety and other disorders.

Additional Educational Sites

Other educational fact-finding sites about OCD are included below. Education is empowerment, and empowerment brings wellness. Here is a link to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Also check out: AnxietyPanic.com For more information about OCD, visit the IOCD Foundation website. Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Linked To Brain Activity Jeffrey Schwartz, M.D. site: http://www.jeffreymschwartz.com/ The Westwood Institute for Anxiety Disorders offers some excellent articles: Four Steps by Dr. Jeffrey Schwartz The Use of Mindfulness in the Treatment of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) by Dr. Jeffrey Schwartz Peace of Mind Foundation: http://www.peaceofmind.com/ Autoimmune Neurological Disorders: the connection between childhood strep throat and OCD Q&A with Dr Michael Jenike at Heathyplace.com: What To Do About the Obsessions Part of OCD OCD Recovery Centers of America ocdrecoverycenters.com

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I Can Confidently Tell You
After 40 years of the turmoil, waves, and ups and downs of my ongoing OCD recovery, I can confidently tell you that one can live a full life with this disorder. My basic story is: 30+ years of teaching college with this disorder. Marrying my beautiful wife and both of us coping with this disorder. She is one patient angel. Making 20+ films and videos and writing two books, so far, about this disorder. And, continuing to be an advocate for healing and hope for this disorder and all mental illnesses. I can also confidently tell you, that there is not enough research about this disorder and not enough education and qualified therapists to help those of us that are struggling. I pray that will change. Most of us have to be our own advocates for what we need and want. I encourage you (and remind myself) to be open and direct with family, friends, and your doctors in explaining what you need to cope with the anxiety and depression that OCD produces. Here's an example; I just talked to my family doctor who has some knowledge of OCD but not the nuances of the disorder. I was inquiring if I had to go through the trauma of some medical tests I get every five years. I told him directly, that having three tests in one year was just too overwhelming for me, especially this year with Covid still on the loose. He understood and did cancel one of the tests. But, I had to summon the courage to ask directly for what I need without over-explaining. I mean truly, how does one explain the feeling of anxiety? It ain't easy as you know. I guess my encouragement to you is to calm your mind down as much as you can and then approach someone who just "doesn't quite get it" with compassion but the directness of your needs. It works for me and I believe it can work for you. Empower yourself with honesty and openness about your feelings. JC <3 (Photography is my way of calming my mind with mindfulness)
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2 weeks ago
I Can Confidently Tell You
After 40 years of the turmoil, waves, and ups and downs of my ongoing OCD recovery, I can confidently tell you that one can live a full life with this disorder. My basic story is: 30+ years of teaching college with this disorder. Marrying my beautiful wife and both of us coping with this disorder. She is one patient angel. Making 20+ films and videos and writing two books, so far, about this disorder. And, continuing to be an advocate for healing and hope for this disorder and all mental illnesses. I can also confidently tell you, that there is not enough research about this disorder and not enough education and qualified therapists to help those of us that are struggling. I pray that will change. Most of us have to be our own advocates for what we need and want. I encourage you (and remind myself) to be open and direct with family, friends, and your doctors in explaining what you need to cope with the anxiety and depression that OCD produces. Heres an example; I just talked to my family doctor who has some knowledge of OCD but not the nuances of the disorder. I was inquiring if I had to go through the trauma of some medical tests I get every five years. I told him directly, that having three tests in one year was just too overwhelming for me, especially this year with Covid still on the loose. He understood and did cancel one of the tests. But, I had to summon the courage to ask directly for what I need without over-explaining. I mean truly, how does one explain the feeling of anxiety? It aint easy as you know. I guess my encouragement to you is to calm your mind down as much as you can and then approach someone who just doesnt quite get it with compassion but the directness of your needs. It works for me and I believe it can work for you. Empower yourself with honesty and openness about your feelings. JC

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Thanks for sharing and caring🙏🙏🙏

Beautiful blues by the way, and I truly understand that honesty is the best way too💙

POSITIVE POSTS FOR OCD & ANXIETY 61
What I Can Do
I think many of us are conditioned through life to focus on
what we can’t do rather than focus on what we can do and what
we have done.
When I was in the hospital years ago with severe OCD, my
psychiatrist said something very important to me that I would
come to understand more deeply later: “The patient is the last
one to see progress.”
I don’t know about you, but I tend to get so enmeshed in the
problem that I miss the strides I have taken forward—even the
tiny ones.
Currently, I’m trying my best to practice a process of
self-reminding. Every time OCD reminds me of what I seemingly
can’t do, I remind myself what I can do and what I have done.
Most of the time I say it out loud so I can hear myself. The
internal dialogue usually goes like this:
OCD: “You can’t get out of the shower in less than 15 minutes.”
Me: “Wait a minute! I can and have gotten out of my shower
rituals in less than 10 minutes. I’ve done it several times and can
and want to do it again. I can and I will!”
So, the next time you think, “I can’t,” remind yourself that “I
want to, and I can.” Even if you are not ready to believe it, you’re
planting the seeds of recovery. Saying it sends the right signals to your subconscious. You can do much more than you think. JC
... See MoreSee Less

4 weeks ago
POSITIVE POSTS FOR OCD & ANXIETY 61
What I Can Do
I think many of us are conditioned through life to focus on
what we can’t do rather than focus on what we can do and what
we have done.
When I was in the hospital years ago with severe OCD, my
psychiatrist said something very important to me that I would
come to understand more deeply later: “The patient is the last
one to see progress.”
I don’t know about you, but I tend to get so enmeshed in the
problem that I miss the strides I have taken forward—even the
tiny ones.
Currently, I’m trying my best to practice a process of
self-reminding. Every time OCD reminds me of what I seemingly
can’t do, I remind myself what I can do and what I have done.
Most of the time I say it out loud so I can hear myself. The
internal dialogue usually goes like this:
OCD: “You can’t get out of the shower in less than 15 minutes.”
Me: “Wait a minute! I can and have gotten out of my shower
rituals in less than 10 minutes. I’ve done it several times and can
and want to do it again. I can and I will!” 
So, the next time you think, “I can’t,” remind yourself that “I
want to, and I can.” Even if you are not ready to believe it, you’re
planting the seeds of recovery. Saying it sends the right signals to your subconscious. You can do much more than you think. JC
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Disclaimer

OCD Coaching Videos are not designed to replace professional OCD Therapy. They are intended to help in the education and coaching for those suffering with OCD. James Callner is an OCD Educator and Coach, teaching from over 35 years of his own recovery experience. The Coaching Videos, Blog Posts and other information on this website are not a replacement for a professional therapist. Mr. Callner contributes his videos to the OCD Treatment Centre in Taunton England. OCD Treatment Centre therapists approve all OCD Coaching Videos. .