Comments

Comments

Thank you for your Comments!

Helping one person makes an infinite difference. I learned that years ago when I started sharing my own recovery. To this day, I know that offering help to those who deal with OCD every day, not only gives them hope – but me too. I am one of you. I’ll continue to offer free OCD Coaching Videos on our web site, YouTube, and Facebook – for the health of it.

Never give up hope,
James Callner

Comments:

“James please never stop making these you have no idea how much you have helped me. Keep up the good work.!!!”

“Your videos are very helpful to me also. Thank you.”

“Fantastic video Jim will help many many people. Great work.”

“Thanks James – the video is fantastic, lots of positivity, encouragement and hope, well done.“

“Thank you for sharing your video. May I share it with my therapist? I know that she has several patients that have difficulty with shower time.“

“You motivated me and reminded me that there IS hope!“

“I watched the video on the Shower. That was magnificent. You should do more video’s on other topics, like how to drive if someone is afraid, or other topics. I have NEVER seen videos like these and these tools can help people experience positive change by WATCHING HOW TO RECOVER.“

“Love that you posted this because I have looked online for help on this and in a few books, and this is a great video.“

“Thanks for posting, this video is a welcome help!“

“Thank you so much for this Jim. This really means a lot. I hope that when I have the courage someday, I will also be part of ‘The Faces of OCD.'”

“Inspiration comes in many forms. Great form Jim.“

“Thanks James for this video. I am glad I am not alone.”

“A Calming, Remedy video.. Thanks for your sharings and best wishes for your helping journey!”

“Thank you for the valuable tools Jim! I wrote down everything you said that I feel would help me. I appreciate the help.”

“I love your words of wisdom and experience, Jim. Thank you for this.”

“When I came across your video about taking a shower with OCD on twitter, I then watched many of your other videos and something just clicked. It was a surreal moment because here, on my iPad screen in the early hours of the morning, I was seeing someone who was just like me. I think you are a real inspiration and the fact that you offered to make a video about exposures just for me, well, all I can say is that I am honored.”

“…this inspired me to create a challenge for OCD awareness week, thank you so much for sharing this video.”

“I just wanted to say that I am now starting to see the effects of positive mental attitude and good therapy with hard work and ERP.”

” I discovered your website tonight and I’ve just finished viewing several of your videos. I’m a 66 yr. old retired teacher who was diagnosed with OCD by a psychiatrist last year. I see now that I’ve had OCD for decades. But it has gotten worse these past few years.”

“Thank you so much for the information on your website. I’ve found it so very helpful tonight and will return to it.”

“I would like you to know that you have been such a massive source of inspiration and hope to me, and I can only dream of being that for other people. You are such a kind human being and I would like to thank you sincerely.I am going out and about, eating in restaurants and spending time with friends again which has drastically improved my life.”

“It’s really nice watching a video about people who understand how I feel.”

LIKE our FB Page

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons

I does help. JC <3 ... See MoreSee Less

4 days ago

I does help. JC

Comment on Facebook

It does not help

Would You Rather?
Would you rather be loved or understood? In this context, I’m defining love as acceptance. I know love and understanding can go hand in hand, and many would say being understood is being loved, but I believe if you have OCD or any mental illness this question becomes vital to our trust in anyone. Whether it be significant others, family, friends, coworkers, doctors, or therapists, personally, I want to be understood because I know deep down that understanding has the potential to lead to real love. Understanding me as a person with OCD is paramount in creating a lasting friendship and relationship based in trust. In turn, I want to understand those that I relate with if they are willing to let me into their lives. Willingness is a big requirement for me. If they are not willing to understand, I’ll shift my expectations and develop a different type of relationship. And that’s OK. Many people just don’t have the capacity to understand, and there’s no judgment or shame in that.
At the writing of this post I’m in my mid sixties having managed OCD for over 36 years, and I’ve heard the stories of hundreds if not thousands of people in my life. In my opinion and experience, the big picture of humanity is that everyone has something they are dealing with mentally, from OCD to depression to anxiety to stress to worry. The list is endless. So, back to the question: Would you rather be loved or understood?
I say that trying to understand in a loving way is the answer to feeling better about yourself and feeling connected to others. And, let us all not forget to also love and understand ourselves. JC <3 P.S. Kite flying on the beach.
... See MoreSee Less

3 weeks ago

Would You Rather? 
Would you rather be loved or understood? In this context, I’m defining love as acceptance. I know love and understanding can go hand in hand, and many would say being understood is being loved, but I believe if you have OCD or any mental illness this question becomes vital to our trust in anyone. Whether it be significant others, family, friends, coworkers, doctors, or therapists, personally, I want to be understood because I know deep down that understanding has the potential to lead to real love. Understanding me as a person with OCD is paramount in creating a lasting friendship and relationship based in trust. In turn, I want to understand those that I relate with if they are willing to let me into their lives. Willingness is a big requirement for me. If they are not willing to understand, I’ll shift my expectations and develop a different type of relationship. And that’s OK. Many people just don’t have the capacity to understand, and there’s no judgment or shame in that.
At the writing of this post I’m in my mid sixties having managed OCD for over 36 years, and I’ve heard the stories of hundreds if not thousands of people in my life. In my opinion and experience, the big picture of humanity is that everyone has something they are dealing with mentally, from OCD to depression to anxiety to stress to worry. The list is endless. So, back to the question: Would you rather be loved or understood?
I say that trying to understand in a loving way is the answer to feeling better about yourself and feeling connected to others. And, let us all not forget to also love and understand ourselves. JC

Comment on Facebook

Beautiful picture!! Really good question though isnt it - those of us who are people pleasers would like to be loved and understood and be 'perfect' in the mix

OCD Mantras vs. Recovery Mantras
(Definition of Mantra/ man·tra mantrə / noun
a statement or slogan repeated frequently.)
OCD has the mantra of, “One more time.”
Recovery as the mantra of, “I'll take the risk to stop.”
OCD has the mantra of, “What if?”
Recovery has the mantra of, “I don't know, so I'm going to stay in this moment.”
OCD has the mantra of, “You're not going to be okay.”
Recovery has the mantra of, “I can handle whatever comes my way.”
OCD has the mantra of, “If you don't think this thought or do this thing, disaster is on its way.”
Recovery has the mantra of, “I’ll handle what life brings me because I’m stronger than I think.”
OCD has the mantra of, “You have to.”
Recovery has the mantra of, “Bullies don't tell me what to do.”
OCD has the mantra of, “You're never going to get better.”
Recovery has a mantra of, “Thanks for sharing, but I'm not buying that.” JC <3
... See MoreSee Less

3 weeks ago

OCD Mantras vs. Recovery Mantras 
(Definition of Mantra/ man·tra  mantrə / noun
a statement or slogan repeated frequently.)
OCD has the mantra of, “One more time.”
Recovery as the mantra of, “Ill take the risk to stop.”
OCD has the mantra of, “What if?”
Recovery has the mantra of, “I dont know, so Im going to stay in this moment.”
OCD has the mantra of, “Youre not going to be okay.”
Recovery has the mantra of, “I can handle whatever comes my way.”
OCD has the mantra of, “If you dont think this thought or do this thing, disaster is on its way.”
Recovery has the mantra of, “I’ll handle what life brings me because I’m stronger than I think.”
OCD has the mantra of, “You have to.”
Recovery has the mantra of, “Bullies dont tell me what to do.”
OCD has the mantra of, “Youre never going to get better.”
Recovery has a mantra of, “Thanks for sharing, but Im not buying that.” JC

Comment on Facebook

Great reminders

really love that " one more time "

Load more

Disclaimer

OCD Coaching Videos are not designed to replace professional OCD Therapy. They are intended to help in the education and coaching for those suffering with OCD. James Callner is an OCD Educator and Coach, teaching from over 35 years of his own recovery experience. The Coaching Videos, Blog Posts and other information on this website are not a replacement for a professional therapist. Mr. Callner contributes his videos to the OCD Treatment Centre in Taunton England. OCD Treatment Centre therapists approve all OCD Coaching Videos. .